Praise for Eric Klinenberg’s GOING SOLO

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Time Magazine’s #1 idea that is changing your life. TIME

“Trailblazing.” Vanity Fair

“This book will change our lives. So important that it is likely to become both a popular read and a social science classic.” Psychology Today

“Fascinating.” Wall Street Journal

“Going Solo … is causing a sensation, both for how it has shaken up our traditional notions of the single life and as a sociological breakthrough.”  Toronto Star

“Going Solo is really about living better together — for all of us, single or not.” Washington Post

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    The Economist, Feb 16 — In Sophocles's play "Philoctetes" the titular hero is abandoned on a dreary island. The punishment seems drastic even by mythic standards. Ten years alone in a cave, screaming over a wound that refuses to heal? Surely death would have been better. But these days a life of solitude is looking much brighter. The proliferation of solitary dwellers is the subject of Eric Klinenberg's new book, "Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone".

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  • MSNBC, Up with Chris Hayes

    Up with Chris Hayes, Feb 11 — This interview aired on MSNBC on February 11, 2012. Up with Chris Hayes focuses on politics including the day’s top headlines, newsmaker interviews, and panels of pundits, politicos and voices from outside the mainstream. It is live on Saturdays and Sundays from 8–10:00 am EST on MSNBC.

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  • Interview with Diane Rehm

    The Diane Rehm Show, Feb 6 — In 1950, four million American adults lived alone. They represented nine percent of all U.S. households. Today, thirty-one million live alone … twenty-eight percent of all households. For the first time in centuries, the majority of all American adults are single. They will spend more of their adult life unmarried than married, and for much of this time they will live alone. The global numbers of people living alone is also skyrocketing, especially in urban areas of the Scandinavian countries, western Europe and Japan. A New York University sociologist examined the factors behind this trend, and how it is transforming our communities.

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